Word of the Day: head

 
 
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Word of the Day
 
November 23, 2015
 
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head (noun, verb, adjective) sound LISTEN icon
 
 
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Head has many meanings. Obviously it is the upper part of the body, as well as the intellect or mind. It is also a position of leadership and the person in charge. As a verb, head means to be in charge (in this sense, the phrasal verb "head up" is often used) or to be first in something. It also means to move toward something, both literally and figuratively.
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Example sentences
 
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If you sit too close to the fire, the sparks will get you.
 
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The teacher thought the twelve-year-old girl's lipstick was too grown-up.
 
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The teacher thought the twelve-year-old girl's lipstick was too grown-up.
 
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José and Lucy never went on a second date because there was no spark.
 
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The CEO's attitude caused a spark of anger in all his employees, but nobody could say anything.
 
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The metal started sparking as soon as the mechanic turned on the machine.
 
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The new taxes sparked a riot.
 
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Multi-word forms
 

get your head around something or wrap your head around something (informal): understand something: "This technique is quite complicated; it will take me a while to get my head around it."

fall head over heels for someone (figurative): fall completely in love with someone: "John fell head over heels for Mary as soon as he saw her."

hold your head up high (or hold your head high; figurative): be proud: "Even though our team lost, they played well, so they can hold their heads up high."

lose your head (figurative): panic: "It's important not to lose your head in an emergency, so try to stay calm." 

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Additional information
 
Head has a lot of other meanings, check out the full definition!
 
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Did you know?
 
"Heads up" is a very common expression. Literally, it means the opposite of what you would expect, and we say it when an object like a ball is flying toward someone and they should move their head down or get out of the way. Example: "Heads up! The ball's going to hit you!" As a noun and spelled with a hyphen, a "heads-up" is a tip or warning. Example: "Karen gave us a heads-up that our boss was on his way into the office."
 
Other forms
 
headed (adjective), headless (adjective)
Origin
 
Head dates back to before 900. It comes from the Old English word hēafod, and is similar to the Old High German word houbit and the Gothic word haubith. In middle English, around the twelth century, the word was he(v)ed, which changed into the form we know now.
 
 
See full definition
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Learn more about head in our forums
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