Monthly Archives

September 2016

Word of the Day: beam

A beam is a bar of metal or wood used to support a structure, such as a roof, and also a piece of wood mounted horizontally off the ground, used in gymnastics…

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Word of the Day: rat

A rat, as you probably know, is a long-tailed rodent similar to a mouse, but larger. However, informally, a rat is a person who betrays someone else in times of trouble…

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Word of the Day: squat

To squat means ‘to crouch or sit with your legs bent closely beneath or in front of your body,’ as when hiding or cowering. The related noun squat can be either the position or the act of squatting…

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Word of the Day: embrace

To embrace means ‘to hug,’ ‘to take someone in your arms,’ or more generally, ‘to enclose or surround’ (though in these senses it is a bit formal)…

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Word of the day: dare

To dare means ‘to have the courage and be brave enough to do something’ or ‘to have the audacity to do something,’ this last sense with a more negative connotation…

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Word of the day: wide

As an adjective, wide means ‘large, of great size from side to side’ and ‘of great scope.’ It also refers to something that has a specific dimension from side to side…

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Word of the day: fence

A fence is a barrier, usually made of posts and wires or wood, that encloses a territory and prevents entrance or keeps livestock (ie, animals in a farm) in…

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Word of the Day: pit

A pit is a hole in the ground, a hole that serves as a trap, or one made for looking for mineral deposits. A mine is also called a pit…

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Word of the Day: wire

A wire is a thin piece of metal that looks like a thread, and it’s also the length of that material used as a conductor of electricity. A wire is also a telegraphic system and a message sent with it.

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Word of the Day: tuck

To tuck means ‘to put something into a closed and secure place’ (often with away) and also ‘to hold something in place by pushing the loose ends of it into or under something’ (often with in, into or under), as we do with clothes or bedsheets.

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