Basic+ Word of the Day: yet

yet (adverb, conjunction) LISTEN

It isn't finished yet.

We use yet in questions when we want to say that we think that something should be true now. For example, if someone should arrive at 5pm, and it’s 5:10 now, we could ask, “Are you almost here yet?”

  • Have you finished that report yet?

We use yet in negative sentences (sentences with not or -n’t) when we want to say that something hasn’t happened, but that it will happen in the future.

  • I haven’t seen the new Star Wars film yet.

Don't confuse it with

We use yet in questions when we think that something should be true now, and we use already when we think that something shouldn’t be true because it’s too early. We often say already because we’re surprised. For example, “Are you tired already? It’s only 7 o’clock!”

In pop culture

When children are bored on long journeys, they often ask their parents, “Are we there yet?” In this video from the movie Shrek 2, Donkey, Shrek, and Fiona are on a long journey together. How many times does Donkey ask, “Are we there yet?”

There are other meanings of yet.

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Word of the Day is released Monday through Friday.

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