Monthly Archives

April 2018

Intermediate+ Word of the Day: cling

To cling means ‘to stick or adhere closely to something.’ If you cling to someone or something, it means you embrace, hold tight, or stay close to them or it and if people cling together, that means they embrace or hold tight to each other. If someone clings to something like an idea or a hope, it means that…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: rap

You probably know that rap is a music style. As a verb, to rap means ‘to strike with a quick, sharp blow’ and ‘to say or shout sharply.’ As a slang term, to rap means ‘to criticize severely,’ ‘to chat about something at length,’ and of course, ‘to talk rhythmically to the beat of rap music,’ As a noun, as well as the music style, a rap is a…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: chuck

In US English, Chuck is a form of the male given name Charles, but chuck is also a verb that means ‘to toss,’ ‘to throw away’ (sometimes followed by out), or ‘to give up’ (sometimes followed by in). It also means ‘to tap lightly,’ normally under the chin. A chuck is therefore a light tap and also a toss or pitch. Talking about food, chuck is the cut of beef between the neck and the shoulder…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: stark

Stark is an adjective that means ‘complete or pure’ and also ‘harsh, grim, or desolate in appearance.’ Something extremely simple or severe can also be called stark, as can something plain, blunt, and not softened. Something sharply distinct can also be called stark. As an adverb, it means…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: split

You might know already that split means ‘to divide into separate portions’ or ‘to separate.’ It can also mean ‘to share,’ if you divide something between different people in a group. As a slang term, to split means ‘to leave.’ As a noun, a split is a crack or, in US English, a piece of wood separated by splitting. Split is also a dessert, an ice-cream dish made with a split banana, ice cream, flavored syrup, and chopped nuts (in the UK, this is…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: throttle

A throttle is a valve in an engine that controls how much fuel enters the cylinders and also a lever or pedal that controls this valve. As a verb, to throttle means ‘to obstruct or check the flow of a fluid, so as to control the speed of an engine.’ It also means ‘to compress the throat to stop air from going in and out’ or ‘to choke or suffocate in any way.’ Figuratively, it means…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: dunk

If you like coffee or tea and you also like cookies or croissants, then you probably dunk your food into your coffee before eating it. You can of course dunk any food item into any beverage or into soup. If you push something or someone briefly under water or any other liquid, that is also to dunk. In US English, to dunk also means ‘to submerge yourself in water.’ In basketball, to dunk means to slam a…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: heave

To heave means ‘to lift with great effort’ and also ‘to lift and then throw with effort.’ To utter with effort is also to heave and so is to rise and fall with a swelling motion. In physiology, sometimes followed by up it means ‘to retch, to attempt to vomit’ or ‘to vomit.’ As a nautical term, to heave means…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: dart

You probably know a dart is a small slender object with a sharp point that can be used as a weapon or as a missile in a game. Darts, used with a singular verb, is the name of the game in which you throw darts at a circular board stuck to a wall. Figuratively, a dart is also a sudden, swift movement. Related to this…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: bristle

A bristle is, most commonly, a short, stiff coarse hair of certain animals like hogs, which are used in making brushes. A short, stiff hair on other animals or humans, like the hairs that make up the stubble on a man’s chin, can also be called a bristle and, generally, anything resembling such a hair can be called a bristle too. As a verb, and when we are talking about hair, to bristle means ‘to stand or rise stiffly.’ Figuratively,…

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