Intermediate+ Word of the Day: tilt

To tilt means ‘to incline or lean something’ and, figuratively, to tend towards something in terms of your opinion or feelings. Tilt is also ‘to attack with a lance,’ like knights on horseback used to do in olden days. In cinematography, to tilt is ‘to move a camera up or down’ in order to film a moving character or object. As a noun, a tilt is the action of tilting or an inclined…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: punt

In rugby and American football, a punt is a kick in which the ball is dropped and kicked before it touches the ground. To punt therefore means ‘to kick a ball before it touches the ground.’ In soccer, goalies also punt when they send the ball back into play. Informally, in US English, punt means ‘to delay or stall for time’ while thinking of an answer to a question or problem and, in UK English, ‘to sell or promote something in an insistent manner.’ Unrelatedly, a punt is a small boat propelled…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: stump

A stump is the lower part of a tree trunk that’s left standing after the upper part is cut down or falls. It’s also the part of a limb of the body that remains after the rest of the limb is cut off. Unrelatedly, in US English, a stump is a campaign tour for political speechmaking. The related verb means ‘to make political campaign speeches.’ To stump also means

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: green

Green is, as you know, the color made up of yellow and blue and we also call a plot of grassy land, especially one in the center of a village, a green. Greens, always in the plural, are edible green leaves such as lettuce, cabbage, or spinach. Figuratively, in US English, money can be called green as well. As an adjective, green refers to anything of the color green, anything covered with leaves, or anything consisting of edible leaves. However, green also means ‘not fully developed,’ when talking about fruit, and, figuratively, it means ‘unexperienced, inmature’…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: creek

In US English, a creek is a stream, smaller than a river. In UK English, it’s a place where the sea runs some way inland along a narrow passage or a tidal estuary. Unrelatedly, a Creek, with a capital letter, is a member of a confederacy of North American Indians who, in historical times, occupied the greater part of Alabama and Georgia….

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