Intermediate+ Word of the Day

Intermediate+ Word of the Day: guzzle

To guzzle means ‘to eat or drink greedily or excessively.’ Figuratively, if someone or something uses something in large quantities, that is also guzzling. Guzzle or gozzle is also used in the South and South Midland of the US as an informal term for…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: cuff

When we are talking about shirts, a cuff is fold or band at the end of a sleeve and, on trousers, mainly in US English, it’s the turned-up fold at the bottom of a trouser leg. In medicine, a cuff is part of a device for recording blood pressure: it’s the inflatable wrap placed around the upper arm. Always in the plural, cuffs are handcuffs, a pair of metal rings that…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: glint

A glint is a quick flash of light or a gleaming brightness. Figuratively, a brief manifestation of something is also called a glint. As a verb, to glint means ‘to shine with a quick flash’ or ‘to reflect or cause to glint’. ‘To move suddenly or dart’ is also to glint, although this meaning is…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: brim

The brim is the upper edge of anything hollow, such as a glass, a bowl, or a cup, and also an edge that sticks out, particularly the one that sticks out of a hat. As a verb, to brim means ‘to be full to the top,’ either literally or figuratively, or, less…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: hunch

A a verb, to hunch means ‘to arch in a hump’, and also ‘to walk, stand or sit in a bent way’. In US English, it can also mean to lunge or thrust yourself forward, though this use is now uncommon. As a noun, a hunch is of course a hump, but it is also a feeling or guess about…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: cake

We’re sure you know that a cake is a breadlike, sweet, baked food, popular at birthday parties or weddings. However, any other food shaped or molded as a mass, can also be a cake and, in general, a shaped block of something, like soap for example, too. Did you know that cake is also a verb? It means ‘to form into a dry layer or crust on the outside’ or ‘to encrust or…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: filth

Filth is disgusting dirt or refuse, any foul matter or, more broadly, foul conditions. Figuratively, any moral impurity, obscenity or corruption can be called filth, as can vulgarity or any obscene language. If you say someone is filth, then you definitely don’t like them—in fact,…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: slump

As a verb, to slump means ‘to fall heavily’ or ‘collapse.’ It also means ‘to fall suddenly’ or ‘deteriorate,’ as prices, value, quality, or efficiency might do. If we are speaking figuratively about spirits or emotions, it means ‘to sink heavily.’ To have a bent position or posture with your body is also to slump. As a noun, a slump is an act, occasion, or instance of slumping, and also a period of time of general inefficiency or ineffectiveness or…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: sag

To sag means ‘to sink downwards because of, or as if because of, weight’ and also ‘to bend downwards,’ also due to weight or pressure. To decline in strength or intensity or to go down in price or value is also to sag. Sag also means ‘droop or hang loosely.’ As a noun, a sag is the act of sagging and also a place where things…

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Intermediate+ Word of the Day: cling

To cling means ‘to stick or adhere closely to something.’ If you cling to someone or something, it means you embrace, hold tight, or stay close to them or it and if people cling together, that means they embrace or hold tight to each other. If someone clings to something like an idea or a hope, it means that…

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